Northern Maryland Combine #26

By Spring 1914, Northern Maryland combine #26 has reached its 40th year of service. The combine was one of two bought in 1874 when passenger service was expanded. For the next 26 years, it was used almost regularly in  mainline passenger service. By 1894 though, the railroad decided to purchase two 40 foot combines to replace the two 30 foot combines.

The two combines went to the shop for a major rebuild into baggage-express cabooses. Both had their passengers compartments extensively rebuilt to include a cupola, an office area for the conductor and a water cooler and small sink for the crew. Combine #26 spent most of its remaining years on the Beckleysville mixed train.

To build 26, I decided to start with the Bachmann combine and create the car I wanted.  The narrow gauge inspiration for the car is DRGW #212 as the Pagosa Combine, but I have found a standard gauge example on the McCloud RR. One could also point to the Sandy River’s caboose’s, but I had DRGW’s 212 in mind.

Northern Maryland Combine #26©

By H. Mathews, December 2016

Advertisements

Scrap wood is useful!

I liked the wooden center pier, so I decided to make an abutment.

Tools and materials list

Scrap 2×4

X-acto handle with a new blade

Ruler

Tools and Materials for a wood abutment. H. Mathews 2016
Tools and Materials for a wood abutment.
H. Mathews 2016

I cut my abutment on the bandsaw because I wanted it to have a slightly curved front, something unique to Northern Maryland Ry abutments.

The arced front prior to cutting. H. Mathews 2016
The arced front prior to cutting.
H. Mathews 2016

I used my bridge story stick to measure the height of the abutment taking into account the bridge tie 8x8s and the steel beams. I cut the piece off a scrap of 2×4, then cut the front on my bandsaw following the slight curve I drew.

The abutment H. Mathews 2016
The abutment
H. Mathews 2016

The next thing to do is to lay out the courses of the cut rock onto the block.

The north abutment with course lines penciled in for cutting. H. Mathew 2016
The north abutment with course lines penciled in for cutting.
H. Mathew 2016

remember to mark which way is up and where they belong!

Remember to mark your locations! H. Mathews 2016
Remember to mark your locations!
H. Mathews 2016

You are now ready to use your imagination and a sharp blade to create cut rocks on the wood.

Ready, set, and cut! H. Mathews 2016
Ready, set, and cut!
H. Mathews 2016

Scrap wood is useful!©

H. Mathews, July 2016