The DROP test

Yes, we have been working on “Slow Train Down South”. However, before we started laying the rail, we conducted a “drop test”. A drop test? Yes, I am sure you have dropped a car, or wheel set or something over the years. Graham dropped the tender for our 2-6-0 and it will need to go to the shop. However, we conducted a different drop test, a layout drop test!

Yes, we dropped the layout. “Slow Train..” is supposed to be a semi-portal layout, and one of us could accidentally drop it one day. Would the frame survive. In theory it should, but I tested it anyone and dropped it on the floor….the concrete floor. This was not one of those David Letterman events were you drop something from a building. We decided to do something a little more realistic. Right now the module sits on a desk, what if it fell if Graham picked it up to move it?  It survived its’ short drop to the floor from desk top height (all of 36 inches) . Nothing happened. No ties when flying in the air. I don’t want to make a habit of dropping our modules on the floor, but it could happen, and now my curiosity is answered whether it would survive.

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The GAP

The baseboard that we used to start the our project was a curve test module. After it was built and used to test various radius curves , it was stored above our model train area. Unfortunately, I managed to damage the foam at the end of the module getting it back down. This was because I did not build the module with a protective piece at that end like the other end. Let’s call it lesson learned. At first I did not think it would be much of an issue until I placed the end piece of our module 2 next to the “Slow Trains Down South” module.

A look down the end of module one. The 3/4 inch plywood should have been carried to the top of the foam
A look down the end of module one. The 3/4 inch plywood should have been carried to the top of the foam
The next module's endplate and the gap in the connection
The next module’s endplate and the gap in the connection
The GAP
The GAP, a closeup

As you can see in the pictures, the junction looked terrible and a fix was very much in the need. So to correct this problem, I took a scrap piece of Luan plywood and cut it to fit the end. Of course, the road bed needed to be fixed, and then more ties relaid. Finally, we are ready to distress the ties and Maggie can paint them.